The Fairytale Trulli of Alberobello. So Neat to seem Unreal.
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The Fairytale Trulli of Alberobello. So Neat to seem Unreal

The Fairytale Trulli of Alberobello. So Neat to seem Unreal

I remember dreaming of seeing one day the trulli of Alberobello since I was a child. With their whitewashed external walls and the typical conic shape of their roofs, they looked to me like coming out directly from a fairytale.

Alberobello, Pretty Trulli

When I grew up, I somehow forgot about the trulli until I found out that the older I get, the closer I feel to the passions of my childhood.

An unexpected invitation to discover Brindisi and the surrounding area was the perfect excuse I had been unwittingly looking for to see more of the Apulia region (where, I admit with a little shame, my steps never led me before) and, of course, visiting Alberobello. At last.

Alberobello, Typical Shops

The day was perfect, with a spotless deep blue sky and the white houses so bright they were almost dazzling. Green vines, pink bougainvillea and geraniums made for the perfect mediterranean color palette. As expected, the town was packed with tourists, most of them from abroad, strolling along the pretty alleys, admiring the trulli from outside and inside, for many can be visited.

Alberobello, View at Sunset

The trulli of Alberobello are a truly unique kind of vernacular architecture. People from this area of Apulia preserved the drywall prehistoric technique and built the typical houses from boulders collected in the surrounding fields, giving them their exquisite, characteristic shape.

The inscription of Alberobello and its astounding trulli as a World Heritage Site by the UNESCO back in 1996 certainly played a role in how the town was preserved and its appeal across the world.

alberobello collage

As I randomly walked along the narrow streets, I marvelled at how the town is well-kept. Neat houses, pretty shops selling souvenirs or local products,  cosy restaurants (although I’m often wary in touristy places), everything spotless.

Alberobello, Beautiful Trulli

I was impressed, and at the same time thoughtful. Most of the people I came across were all ‘oooh‘ and ‘aaah‘ about the trulli of Alberobello. I was captured by the unquestionable beauty of  this very special town and, at the same time, I  felt that I was not fully convinced.

Alberobello, Beautiful Roofs

I spent only a few hours in Ostuni, enough to fall in love with the ‘white city‘. However, although I stayed a few days in Alberobello, I was not feeling the so-called ‘wow factor‘. Why was that?

It took me a while to understand my own feelings, until I went back thinking of my trip to Flanders, a region that was one of my best recent discoveries.

With all the due differences, Alberobello was a little like Bruges. Both unarguably awesome, but like open-air museums. Se neat to seem unreal. So perfect they seemed to lack of real life. This is likely the reason Ghent, differently from Bruges, talked to my heart rather than to  my brain. And most likely this is why in the end for as much I loved the trulli of Alberobello I felt even more fascinated by the old ones I saw in the near-by countryside.

Alberobello Typical Houses

Would I recommend to visit Alberobello and the enchanting trulli? Definitely yes.

Whether this unique village will touch more of your brain or of your heart is very much depending on how you are, what you like, what gives you emotions and your experiences. No matter what kind of cords it will stir, it’s a beautiful place you won’t forget.

Did it ever happen to you feeling that a place is ‘too perfect’?

 

Practical information:

Getting there: The closest airports to reach Alberobello are Bari or Brindisi, connected with a number of low-cost airlines operating throughout Europe. For people visiting from overseas, Milan and Rome airports are both well-connected with Apulia.

Travel addict and passionate about photography, Simon Falvo started Wild About Travel back in 2009. Leveraging her strong PR background, she developed an extensive knowledge of Digital Communications and Social Media Marketing. Besides travel writing SImon holds workshops and trainings, she collaborated with tourism boards for digital marketing campaigns and participated as a speaker at several events.
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9 Comments
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    […] Everything is pretty and charming in Portovenere, without being too artificially embellished to please the tourists, like I felt in Alberobello, the famous town in Apulia so perfect to seem unreal. […]

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    Posted at 11:46h, 24 October Reply

    […] may not have the UNESCO WHS status of  Alberobello, but Locorotondo is listed as one of the most beautiful hamlets in Italy and it’s not hard to […]

  • Kathryn Burrington
    Posted at 11:43h, 01 February Reply

    Lovely photos, as always. I visited Alberobello a few years ago but was only there briefly and didn’t manage to get the photos I wanted. Would love to go back to that part of Italy one day.

  • Ross
    Posted at 15:41h, 25 January Reply

    That looks cool. I never even heard of it before but I’ll put it on my list next time I’m in Italy. Great photos by the way.

  • Wesley
    Posted at 05:28h, 14 January Reply

    This place looks amazing.

  • Natasha von Geldern
    Posted at 21:21h, 08 January Reply

    I guess San Gimignano is another example. It is so important that these places are restored/maintained but it seems inevitable that they lose some of their ‘heart’ at the same time. Love the pics!

  • Corinne
    Posted at 11:27h, 17 December Reply

    Simon, I so agree with you. I loved the trulli, but I loved the run down ones in the fields, the one in the back of the farmer’s house, the stone exteriors…not whitewashed.

    Love your photoas as always, but especially the rooftop one!

    Enjoy!

  • Caitlyn
    Posted at 11:28h, 16 December Reply

    Those pictures seem surreal! I love your Bruges/Gent analogy – having visited them both I can now get an idea of Alberobello. Still makes me want to visit, though 🙂

  • Gaelyn
    Posted at 00:37h, 16 December Reply

    Does seem to be a problem with some ‘tourist’ sites that they don’t quite feel real. I like exploring the back streets and surrounding countryside to get a better feel of the real. Yet your photos show an amazing architecture.

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